Newest club on campus open to all students with an interest in poetry

Freddy+Michael%2C+19%2C+left%2C+Kedar+Rozi%2C+22%2C+center%2C+and+Emily+Punch%2C+18%2C+gather+for+the+first+meeting+of+the+Live+Poet+Society+Club+outside+the+Moorpark+College+library+on+Saturday%2C+April+27.+Photo+credit%3A+David+Haiby
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Newest club on campus open to all students with an interest in poetry

Freddy Michael, 19, left, Kedar Rozi, 22, center, and Emily Punch, 18, gather for the first meeting of the Live Poet Society Club outside the Moorpark College library on Saturday, April 27. Photo credit: David Haiby

Freddy Michael, 19, left, Kedar Rozi, 22, center, and Emily Punch, 18, gather for the first meeting of the Live Poet Society Club outside the Moorpark College library on Saturday, April 27. Photo credit: David Haiby

Freddy Michael, 19, left, Kedar Rozi, 22, center, and Emily Punch, 18, gather for the first meeting of the Live Poet Society Club outside the Moorpark College library on Saturday, April 27. Photo credit: David Haiby

Freddy Michael, 19, left, Kedar Rozi, 22, center, and Emily Punch, 18, gather for the first meeting of the Live Poet Society Club outside the Moorpark College library on Saturday, April 27. Photo credit: David Haiby

By Emily Ledesma

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Moorpark College has over 45 student organizations on campus and one of the newest additions is the Live Poet Society.

The Live Poet Society is a club “open to all those interested in examining, writing, or performing poetry” according to their description on the Moorpark College website.

The Live Poet Society was started by 18-year-old Emily Punch, psychology and cognitive science student.

Punch began writing poetry in middle school but it was not until professor David Birchman’s ENG M01 class that she felt empowered to do truly whatever she wanted with her writing.

Prospective club members can expect to write about a word of the day as well as be challenged with different styles of poetry.

“We’re looking for like-minded individuals to bounce ideas off of and hopefully spread poetry and make more,” said Punch.

Punch hopes as the organization gains more members that the future will include trips to poetry slams, open mic nights, and poetry conventions.

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Kedar Rozi, 22, reads to members of the Live Poets Society at their first meeting at Moorpark College on Saturday, April 27. Photo credit: David Haiby

“It would be great to expand the presence of poetry from this campus to the whole area of Moorpark,” said club Vice President Kedar Rozi.

Rozi, a 22-year-old and member of the board, admitted the whole organization is “Emily’s brainchild” and his main role is to provide moral support.

The Live Poet Society has hosted two club meetings so far and despite the small attendance, members are filled with excitement for the future.

“It would be great if a lot of people showed up but I would rather have fewer people who are more interested than more people who are less interested,” said Rozi.

The Live Poet Society plans to invite published poets and published Moorpark College staff members to speak to the club members, as well as hopefully speakers from the writing festivals.

Moorpark College English professor Wade Bradford has been more than happy to help foster the creative spirit he knows Moorpark students have by being the adviser for the organization.

“This club is driven by a talented poet,” said Bradford. “I think the club is in good hands with [Punch] at the helm.”

The Live Poet Society will be holding meetings outside of the Library (LLR) on the first-floor patio every Saturday until the end of the school year. During the summer the organization will host club meetings every other Saturday. Meetings last from 10 a.m. to 12 p.m.

Students can expect a “supportive, artistic environment” from the Live Poet Society where Bradford “hopes that students will be able to bond over poetry, literature, and creative writing.”

“I hope they find fun and inventive ways to express themselves,” Bradford.

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