Student Voice

Moorpark Review invites students to display their artistic talent for 20th-anniversary edition

Suzi+Bloom%2C+an+English+major%2C+creates+chalk+advertisements+for+the+Moorpark+Review+on+Raider+Walk%2C+on+Feb.+5%2C+2019.+Bloom+is+the+editor+for+the+Student+Essay+Anthology+section.+Photo+credit%3A+Evan+Reinhardt
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Moorpark Review invites students to display their artistic talent for 20th-anniversary edition

Suzi Bloom, an English major, creates chalk advertisements for the Moorpark Review on Raider Walk, on Feb. 5, 2019. Bloom is the editor for the Student Essay Anthology section. Photo credit: Evan Reinhardt

Suzi Bloom, an English major, creates chalk advertisements for the Moorpark Review on Raider Walk, on Feb. 5, 2019. Bloom is the editor for the Student Essay Anthology section. Photo credit: Evan Reinhardt

Suzi Bloom, an English major, creates chalk advertisements for the Moorpark Review on Raider Walk, on Feb. 5, 2019. Bloom is the editor for the Student Essay Anthology section. Photo credit: Evan Reinhardt

Suzi Bloom, an English major, creates chalk advertisements for the Moorpark Review on Raider Walk, on Feb. 5, 2019. Bloom is the editor for the Student Essay Anthology section. Photo credit: Evan Reinhardt

By Tessa Sever

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Celebrating their 20th anniversary, the Moorpark Review is back to showcase the art its college students and community members have to offer.

As a student-centered magazine, in which students are choosing, editing, and designing the magazine and the pieces it includes, the Moorpark Review stands by its website’s statement.

“The editors’ objective is to publish consistently the progressive, eclectic art that reflects the diversity of attitude and perspective in this creative community,” from Moorpark Review Online.

This year marks the 20th anniversary of the Moorpark Review. Started in 1998 by Tracy Tennenhouse and Hart Schulz, the very first edition came out in 1999. Schulz has been retired for a couple of years now so Tennenhouse works with Jerry Mansfield who co-advices and teaches the project.

“We are asking the student editors from the past 20 years to pick their favorite works of their year,” Tennenhouse said. “We will be publishing those works along with the 2019 edition.”

The Moorpark Review sees around 300 submissions including poetry, short fiction, art, music, and short films, year-round. However, these submissions are only viewed and graded between Jan. and March, they are collected and held in a custom designed platform, designed by a former Moorpark Review student years ago.

“We use an anonymous grading approach to our English 47 Literary Magazine Production class,” Tennenhouse said. “We have student editors and staff who judge the works based upon agreed criteria. We try to be as fair and objective as possible.”

Along with a printed edition, the Moorpark Review also has the Moorpark Review Online and the Student Essay Anthology, S.E.A. for short. The online version of the magazine holds completely separate works of art and includes submissions from anyone, not just students, faculty, and alumni of Moorpark College.

The S.E.A. contains essays that were nominated by faculty and sent to the English Department Writing Award committee, and in turn, can end up on the Moorpark Review website under their S.E.A. tab.

The Moorpark Review encourages everyone to submit their works, multiple submissions are allowed and can be in multiple categories. The deadline for the May issue of the magazine is March 18. It is best for applicants to submit early in order to be considered for publication.

“The [published] books are available in the [Moorpark] bookstore, and their website as well,” Tennenhouse said.

To submit and learn more about the Moorpark Review please go to the website.

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