Student Voice

Finding that student-work balance

Brisa+Calan%2C+19%2C+works+to+replace+printer+paper+in+the+self-checkout+at+the+Newbury+Park+Target.+Photo+credit%3A+Macey+Klipp
Brisa Calan, 19, works to replace printer paper in the self-checkout at the Newbury Park Target. Photo credit: Macey Klipp

Brisa Calan, 19, works to replace printer paper in the self-checkout at the Newbury Park Target. Photo credit: Macey Klipp

Brisa Calan, 19, works to replace printer paper in the self-checkout at the Newbury Park Target. Photo credit: Macey Klipp

Macey Klipp

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Maintaining a full load of classes can be challenging, and for some students the hectic schedule does not end with school. Even still, many college students obtain full and part time jobs throughout the semester and are able to create a healthy balance between the two.

Kristen Banaszkiewicz, a 19 year old sophomore at Moorpark College, is taking 20 units this semester, along with balancing her long term customer service job at the Newbury Park Kohl’s.

“I used to work about 20 to 25 hours a week in my past semesters,” Banaszkiewicz said. “Since I’m now taking a larger volume of classes I work about 17 hours a week”.

When not busy studying for several classes, students like Banaszkiewicz are able to work at local stores throughout the week and still find time to relax. Many employers hire students so they are are flexible with scheduling around school as well as personal activities. A major student dilemma for students is figuring out what amount of school and work is healthy for a full time or part time student. Moorpark College health educator Allison Barton worked with countless students to help build time management skills.

“Our district policy regarding student workers says the limit here is 20 per week while school is in session,” Barton said. “I think that that’s a lot if you carry a very heavy load and a person would really need to look at the whole picture, regardless.”

Barton noted a Hindi philosophy that centers around shedding the excess stress and weight from one’s life to ensure success and emphasizes it not only for herself but every student who comes her way.

Rylee Krowpman, a 19 year old sophomore, has attended Moorpark College for a year and half and has continuously worked as an electronics team member at the Newbury Park Target for the same amount of time. Krowpman works between 25 and 30 hours a week while also attending four onsite classes and one online.

“I know how to time manage really well,” Krowpman said. “I set my priorities and try not to stray away from them.”

In her free time away from school and work, Krowpman enjoys hanging out with friends, going to the beach and seeing movies.

Brisa Calan, a 19 year old sophomore at California Lutheran University, attends school full time while also working part time as a cashier/ guest service team member at the Newbury Park Target.

“[On] average [I work] 25 hours, it depends if I’m in school or not,” Calan said. “[Target] has been really good about being flexible with my class schedule.”

Calan also manages her time by studying on her breaks at work and relaxing by painting or hanging out with friends when she can.

While some students have chosen to forgo a job and just focus on school, there are many positives to holding down a job while attending classes. Having a job can increase one’s focus, responsibility, and drive to succeed.

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