Student Voice

MC students find solidarity and determination at the Women’s March

Thousands+of+signs+regarding+voting%2C+sexual+assault%2C+and+equality+are+held+up+high+by+the+attendees+of+the+Women%27s+March.+Photo+credit%3A+Emily+Consaga
Thousands of signs regarding voting, sexual assault, and equality are held up high by the attendees of the Women's March. Photo credit: Emily Consaga

Thousands of signs regarding voting, sexual assault, and equality are held up high by the attendees of the Women's March. Photo credit: Emily Consaga

Thousands of signs regarding voting, sexual assault, and equality are held up high by the attendees of the Women's March. Photo credit: Emily Consaga

Emily Nelissen

Hang on for a minute...we're trying to find some more stories you might like.


Email This Story






Students at Moorpark College wanted the public and the government in power to “Hear Our Vote!” when they attended the Women’s March in Los Angeles on Saturday morning.

“I went because I’m politically frustrated with the world,” said 20-year-old film major Emily Consaga. “I had to do something.”

While many attendees feel an obligation to spread their opinion, the emphasis of this year’s Women’s March was for women and men to realize the importance of voting this November during the midterm election. It is vital that the voting majority spread their messages of inclusivity and equality for women, LGBTQ+ community, and other minority groups so that the government actually reflects the view of the public, according to the Women’s March Impact Statement.

Consaga said she was surrounded by over 700,000 people in downtown Los Angeles as she marched down the streets and heard powerful women like Scarlett Johansson, Natalie Portman and Viola Davis talk about the pressing issues involving equality in today’s society.

According to Moorpark student Rhianna Wicken, the march itself was full of passionate people who were dedicated to fighting for what is right. There were a variety of signs that conveyed how each person was feeling and what they were marching for.

In fact, the 21-year-old anthropology major said she marched behind a small girl and her father. The girl had Princess Leia buns in her hair, and she held a sign that read “This is a rebellion, isn’t it? I rebel.”

“My heart was so full in that moment,” said Wicken. “She was out there being a little activist. I can just imagine the conversation that she had with her dad when she told him that she wanted to go to the march.”

Likewise to the father and daughter, Wicken herself said that she felt like it was her and her mother’s civic duty to attend the march. They went last year, and wanted to get their message about the importance of reproductive rights and freedoms across.

Wicken said that she wants to make sure that everyone knows that reproductive freedom is so much more than people think it is. It includes access to birth control, healthcare for trans women and trans men, accurate sexual education and trying to end sexual violence against minorities and women.

As a matter of fact, the speeches that followed the march seemed to circle around the significance of sexual abuse and assault. Davis’ speech was full of passion as she discussed the Me Too Movement and about her own experiences dealing with sexual assault. Consaga said this truly struck a chord in her.

“We are trying to fight for human decency and that’s all it is,” said Consaga.

Consaga also noted that during the speeches a woman fainted because of the heat and abundance of people, but it eventually turned into a moment that truly expressed that human decency. Everyone was looking out for her and trying get water bottles. The trailers for the speakers happened to be right beside the woman, and people were able to rally the security to help her. She ended up being okay because of the friendliness of these people.

Overall, the Women’s March truly become a reflection of social change, solidarity, and the importance of voting during this midterm election. It allowed people to speak out, and was deemed an unforgettable and recommended experience by Consaga and Wicken.

“I know that people who think one way won’t change, but we need to stop tearing each other down because it’s going to tear all of us down,” said Wicken.

Print Friendly, PDF & Email

Leave a Comment

If you want a picture to show with your comment, go get a gravatar.




*