Student Voice

Writing Center lets students write to veterans

Student+Remi+Mendez%2C+chooses+paper+to+write+her+letter+to+the+veterans+for+the+Writing+Center+event.+Photo+credit%3A+Ash+Dondeti
Student Remi Mendez, chooses paper to write her letter to the veterans for the Writing Center event. Photo credit: Ash Dondeti

Student Remi Mendez, chooses paper to write her letter to the veterans for the Writing Center event. Photo credit: Ash Dondeti

Student Remi Mendez, chooses paper to write her letter to the veterans for the Writing Center event. Photo credit: Ash Dondeti

Ash Dondeti

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The Writing Center hosted a letter writing event where students and faculty could create and send letters to veterans overseas on Wednesday, Nov. 8.

The event was a part of Veterans week, where students could engage in activities to honor and commemorate our veterans.

“The Writing Center does a lot of letter writing events but this is our first time for the military,” said Kim Lewis, volunteer at the Writing Center. “It’s an opportunity for students to learn a lost art form while also showing appreciation and gratitude for people who sacrifice so much.”

The center will be sending letter to the veterans through a program called Operation Gratitude, which is a veteran organization that has sent 2 million care packages to soldiers, sailors, airmen and coast guardsmen deployed overseas. According to Operation Gratitude, the packages include snacks, hygiene products, handmade gifts and personal letters of support.

Supporting a program that helps connect people to veterans is important to Tracy Tennenhouse, co-director of the Writing Center.

“The art of the handwritten letter is almost a lost art, and we’re trying to keep that alive by letting students have a personal interaction with writing,” said Tennenhouse. “You may never get a letter back, especially with this event, but it feels good to write something and send it.”

Students could come into room 318 in the library and write their letters of support. The event garnered a lot of support and had students and teachers alike constantly showing up the entire two hours the event was happening. Students diligently and thoughtfully wrote their letters before dropping them off and moving on with their day.

“I just feel like when you’re overseas, it can be tough to feel remembered and appreciated,” said Taylor Ogilvie, an 18-year-old Business major. “Getting your own personal letter can make you feel special and understand how grateful everyone is back home.”

People with scheduling conflicts could also have written their letters at home and come in to drop them off so they could be mailed off. This opportunity allows as many people to write letters to the soldiers as possible.

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