The student news site for Moorpark College.

Student Voice

Clothesline Project confronts the issue of domestic violence

20-year-old+Music+major+Jacob+Beeker%2C+left%2C+and+21-year-old+Business+major+Toni+Chavez%2C+right%2C+decorate+the+shirts+they+intend+to+hang+alongside+Raider+Walk.+The+shirts+were+created+as+a+testimony+to+the+problem+of+domestic+and+sexual+violence.+Photo+credit%3A+Nicole+Szczepanek
20-year-old Music major Jacob Beeker, left, and 21-year-old Business major Toni Chavez, right, decorate the shirts they intend to hang alongside Raider Walk. The shirts were created as a testimony to the problem of domestic and sexual violence. Photo credit: Nicole Szczepanek

20-year-old Music major Jacob Beeker, left, and 21-year-old Business major Toni Chavez, right, decorate the shirts they intend to hang alongside Raider Walk. The shirts were created as a testimony to the problem of domestic and sexual violence. Photo credit: Nicole Szczepanek

20-year-old Music major Jacob Beeker, left, and 21-year-old Business major Toni Chavez, right, decorate the shirts they intend to hang alongside Raider Walk. The shirts were created as a testimony to the problem of domestic and sexual violence. Photo credit: Nicole Szczepanek

Nicole Szczepanek

Hang on for a minute...we're trying to find some more stories you might like.


Email This Story






“I’m free, thank God I’m alive,” bleeds through an anonymous shirt hanging outside of the Social Science building. “They can’t break you,” reads another nearby.

Shirts emblazoned with the personal messages of survivors underlined the affects of domestic and sexual violence along Raider Walk last Thursday, Oct. 26. The nationwide Clothesline Project offered support to those victimized by hanging shirts decorated with words and artwork throughout campus.

For 20-year-old Gender Studies major and Feminism Today President Hadar Amran, this event was more than simply spreading awareness, but also ensuring that students do not feel alone while confronting the matter.

“It gives them an opportunity to share their stories in a close community, feel comfortable and educate others on the reality of this issue,” said Amran. “We’re putting it on campus because I feel like it’s really prominent for this time in people’s lives.”

Feminism Today joined forces with fellow club Rain No More to organize the event, both of which supplied shirts and other materials needed to create the personal testimonies. Elana Marino, 26-year-old Film major and secretary of Rain No More, was one of many members handing out purple ribbons, pins, and informative pamphlets to passerby students.

“Not only are the survivors able to speak out, but they are able to do so creatively,” said Marino. “I think that’s really fantastic.”

The Clothesline Project was originally created in 1990, after a coalition of women’s groups in Massachusetts discovered that while 58,000 soldiers died in the Vietnam war, another 51,000 women were killed at homed, by men who supposedly loved them, during the same time period. Since then, the event has spread nationwide and has been held at Moorpark College for over ten years.

Students meandered through Raider Walk slower than usual as the reality of domestic and sexual abuse resonated on a tangible level.

“This is a growing issue, and we see it becoming desensitized through social media,” said Justin Demoss, 18, Kinesiology major. “It’s nice for some people to have an epiphany every once in a while and just talk to people who have been through it, rather than someone on Twitter or Instagram.”

Taking action beyond social media also connects Kali Garrett, a 22-year-old Fine Arts major, to finding success while evoking change within her community.

“I feel like I’m actually doing something,” said Garrett. “I can complain on the computer all day long, but if I’m here with other like-minded people, we can actually accomplish something like this project we’re doing right now.”

Feminism Today and Rain No More will continue to draw attention to issues regarding sexual and domestic violence throughout the year.

“I think its very important for students to be aware of the realities of sexual abuse — not just for women, but for men as well,” said Garrett. “Spreading awareness may make people who are hurting inside feel safer to come out and get help for what they’ve been through.”

Print Friendly, PDF & Email

Leave a Comment

If you want a picture to show with your comment, go get a gravatar.




*